The creation of a verdant space is a sensitive matter

The creation of a verdant space is a sensitive matter

When I speak or write about gardening I often like to recall phrases by landscape designers.  In particular, many are the phrases from the book “The Education of a Gardener” by Russell Page a book that all garden lovers should have in their library.  One of my favorites is the following:   “When I compose a landscape or create a garden, but even when I just place a vase upon a windowsill,  I pose myself a problem similar to that of a painter, in other words, I worry about the relationship between the objects that make up the whole picture whether they be woods, fields or water, rocks or trees, bushes and plants or groups of plants.

I believe that each object has emanations, that is to say that it emits specific vibrations that go beyond its physical mass.  Vibrations that vary according to the type of object, the material of which it is composed, its color,  structure and  form.  Each tree is made up of a trunk, branches, more or less large, and the bark of the tree trunk differs from that of a twig, while the texture of the foliage varies with the changing seasons. The same thing holds true for rocks.  The texture and composition of marble, for example, is different from that of granite or sandstone and, moreover, like the shape and color of a flower or fruit, determine the speed and size of the emanations of each object, and consequently influencing the reciprocal game.”

This text fully expresses that careful attention must be dedicated to every simple combination or addition  to an artistic creation such as that of the creation of a garden.  Russell Page compares himself to a painter but the art of photography is perhaps more similar to the art of creating a garden.  I myself have more fun taking pictures rather than painting , which I know nothing about. When I take a photo I always pose myself the problem of the harmony and proportions of the objects that make up the image.  When creating gardens, in fact, you need to deal with this and more.  Perhaps an even better analogy is that with an orchestra conductor.   One who creates gardens cannot limit himself to only the harmonic composition of an image but also on a series of vibrant emotions that alternate such as plants that change in size altering  the initial volumetric balances, blooms that come and those that go like an instrumental orchestra expertly guided along different and parallel orchestral tracks.