Good things come to those who wait

Good things come to those who wait

I often meet people that only take pleasure in artificial plants and seem to be satisfied with them.  They want plants that will not dirty, that are always green and, if possible, flower all year round.   Too often we want to have our garden at the peak of its beauty throughout the year.  Instead, I believe it is important to rediscover the pleasure of waiting for that wonderful moment to happen and that will last only for a limited time, that’s to say, when your tidy, well-groomed garden suddenly experiences an explosion of beauty.

If your garden is always at its best, we tend to get used to a certain standard and consequently perceive it as “normal” missing out on the pleasure of experiencing a thrilling “garden” moment.

A few years ago, I designed a part of an already existing garden by creating a room of roses.  Some of these were “modern roses”  that bloom again for many months  while others were “antique roses” with a single, magnificent bloom concentrated in the month of May (we will talk more about these roses in one of our next Gardening Magazine numbers) .

A part of this garden was bounded by a twenty feet high wall on which I had trained an American Vine and the Alberic Barbier climbing rose, a wichuraiana rose with a creamy white, fragrant bloom.  Although the “modern roses” would keep the garden flowery for most of the spring and summer seasons, in May, with the blooming of the “antique roses” together with the “modern roses” already in bloom created an impressive effect.  So much so that the owner awaited the month of May with gret trepidation inviting friends to come and experience the remarkable beauty of that symphony of rose.  Thus, the month of May had become a special moment marked by the singularity of the garden that bestowed  to all an exuberance of fleeting and unique flowers.